Medical Anthropology: A Biocultural Approach



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Andrea S. Wiley, John S. Allen

(Ebook pdf) Medical Anthropology: A Biocultural Approach

"Medical Anthropology makes it evident that the human illness experience necessitates an understanding from a non-biological perspective, and reading it will change the way many students view human health and illness."--Helen Cho, Davidson College "Medical Anthropology is very accessible and relevant and stands as an effective tool for demonstrating the interaction of culture, health, and the environment."--Jonathan Maupin, Vanderbilt University"Medical Anthropology makes it evident that the human illness experience necessitates an understanding from a non-biological perspective, and reading it will change the way many students view human health and illness."--Helen Cho, Davidson College "Medical Anthropology is very accessible and relevant and stands as an effective tool for demonstrating the interaction of culture, health, and the environment."--Jonathan Maupin, Vanderbilt UniversityAbout the AuthorDr. Andrea Wiley received her B.A. in Biological Basis of Behavior from University of Pennsylvania; M.A.'s in Demography and Anthropology from University of California, Berkeley, and her PhD in medical anthropology from University of California-Berkeley UC San Francisco in 1992. Her interests are in the areas of maternal and child health, nutrition, demography, adaptation, and human life history. She has conducted long-term fieldwork in India, both in the Himalaya (the topic of her first book, An Ecology of High Altitude Infancy; Cambridge University Press, 2004) and now in Pune, where she is conducting research on the relationship between milk consumption and child growth. She is also author of Re-Imagining Milk (Routledge, 2011) and working on a new comparative book on milk in India and the U.S. She is currently Professor of Anthropology and Director of the Human Biology Program at Indiana University in Bloomington, IN. Dr. John S. Allen received his BA in Anthropology and Molecular Biology, and his MA and PhD in Anthropology from U.C. Berkeley. After completing a postdoc working on the neurogenetics of Alzheimer disease at Stanford University, he joined the Department of Anthropology at the University of Auckland, New Zealand. He subsequently worked as a neuroscience researcher at the University of Iowa, where he also taught medical anthropology. He is currently a research scientist in the Dornsife Cognitive Neuroscience Imaging Center and the Brain and Creativity Institute, University of Southern California. His primary research interests are the evolution of the human brain and behavior and behavioral disease. He has conducted fieldwork in Japan, New Zealand, Papua New Guinea, and Palau. He has received awards for his teaching both as a graduate student instructor at U.C. Berkeley and as a faculty member at the University of Auckland. He is the co-author (with Craig Stanford and Susan Ant n) of the popular text, Biological Anthropology: The Natural History of Humankind (3rd edition, Pearson, 2012). He is also the author of The Lives of the Brain: Human Evolution and the Organ of Mind (Harvard University Press, 2009) and the forthcoming The Omnivorous Mind: Our Evolving Relationship with Food (Harvard University Press, 2012). how do i write a book review Medical Anthropology: A Biocultural Approach


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0 of 0 people found the following review helpful. Im glad to have had the opportunity to read this text ...By blakePurchased this for a Health and Society college course that adopted an educational discipline in which incorporated numerous books to collectively create an opportunity for students to expand their appreciation for such a dynamic scientific field of study. Im glad to have had the opportunity to read this text book. Learning about Paul Farmer and structural violence has had a direct impact on how I view social constructs and societal issues and norm's.3 of 3 people found the following review helpful. A Fascinating ReadBy Ness WellingtonI have this as a textbook for my Medical Anthropology class this semester, and am impressed with how well-written, thought-provoking, and easy to get through it is. It actually makes me want to do the readings for class assignments rather than just briefly skim the text before class like other dry textbooks have made me do in the past. This reading would still be interesting outside of a class setting. (And the paper the book is printed on smells really nice, but that just may be me being weird...)1 of 1 people found the following review helpful. Class TextbookBy Richard ThorntonMy Intro to Med Anthro class used this as the primary textbook for the first half of the class, and it covers all the important topics in just enough detail with examples of successful interventions.


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